Jan
25
Thu

Faculty Forum Online – Super Storms and Extreme Weather
Speakers:
Howard Bluestein ’70, SM ’72, PhD ’76, Allison Wing PhD ’14, and Adam Sobel PhD ’98

More info: HERE

Jan
29
Mon
Department Lecture Series
IAP Origin of Life Seminar Series @ MIT Green Building
Jan 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

“What is “I”: The Role of Compartmentalisation in the Origins of Life”
Speaker: Anna Wang, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University

More info: HERE

Jan
30
Tue

“What Should We Talk About When We Talk About Health?”

Speaker: 

Sandro Galea, M.D. | Boston University

ical

Date: 

Tuesday, January 30, 2018 – 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

54-915

Science for the Public: Science Literacy Lecture Series
Lecture – 7-7:30PM | Q&A – 7:30-8PM

This series is hosted by Science for the Public – a grassroots nonprofit organization committed to improving public understanding of, and appreciation for, science. Visit the Science for the Public website for science info and for videos of other programs featuring outstanding scientists.

Speaker: Sandro Galea, M.D. | Robert A Knox Professor and Dean of School of Public Health | Boston University

Why do we care so much about health, spend so much money on it, and yet do worse at it than essentially any other peer country? Why have we been spending ever more on health and getting ever less healthy as a country? It is, at heart, because we are thinking about our health the wrong way. We keep thinking that to improve our health we can focus only on me, on the individual. And therefore, if only I took care of my lifestyle, and I invested enough money to make sure I have the right medicine when I need it, I am going to be healthier and life longer. And that is the wrong approach. If we want to make sure we promote health, we need to look beyond medicine, beyond how we can make ourselves better once we are already sick and think carefully about the forces around us that create a healthy world. We need to understand the aspects of the world that can genuinely get us on the path towards healthy living and keep us there. And to do so we need to talk about some very different things than we talk about right now when we talk about health. We need to talk about money, power, politics, pain and pleasure, what we value, how we live, and about where we live. We need to change our script on health. This presentation is a step in that direction.

About the Speaker

Dr. Galea is a physician and an epidemiologist. He is the Robert A. Knox Professor and Dean at the Boston University School of Public Health. Prior to his appointment at Boston University, Dr Galea served as the Gelman Professor and Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at the University of Michigan and at the New York Academy of Medicine. In his scholarship, Dr Galea is centrally interested in the social production of health of urban populations, with a focus on the causes of brain disorders, particularly common mood-anxiety disorders and substance abuse.

He has long had a particular interest in the consequences of mass trauma and conflict worldwide, including as a result of the September 11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa, and the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This work has been principally funded by the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and several foundations. He has published over 650 scientific journal articles, 50 chapters, and 12 books and his research has been featured extensively in current periodicals and newspapers. His latest book, co-authored with Dr Katherine Keyes, is Population Health Science, was published by Oxford University Press in 2016. Dr Galea has a medical degree from the University of Toronto, and graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University; he has an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow. He was named one of TIME magazine’s epidemiology innovators and has been listed by Thomson Reuters as one of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” for the Social Sciences.

He is past-president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Epidemiological Society. Dr Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards for this research, including the Rema Lapouse Award from the American Public Health Association and the Robert S Laufer Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress. He is a regular contributor to Fortune magazine and has published widely in lay press including in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, the Boston Globe, and The New York Times. His research has been cited in these journals and in BBC, Slate, WBUR, and NPR, among others. Dr Galea serves frequently on advisory groups to national and international organizations. He currently serves on the Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities and has formerly served as chair of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Community Services Board and as member of its Health Board.

For scientists interested in sharing their work, please contact Yvonne Stapp (yvonne@scienceforthepublic.org).

Feb
2
Fri
Department Lecture Series
IAP Origin of Life Seminar Series @ MIT Green Building
Feb 2 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

“The Planetary Battery for the Origins of Life: The Example of Mars”
Speaker: Vlada Stamenkovic, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CalTech

More info: HERE

Feb
13
Tue

“Ecological and Psychological Perspectives on Climate Change”

Speaker: 

Brian Helmuth & John Coley | Northeastern University

ical

Date: 

Tuesday, February 13, 2018 – 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

54-915

Science for the Public: Science Literacy Lecture Series
Lecture – 7-7:30PM | Q&A – 7:30-8PM

This series is hosted by Science for the Public – a grassroots nonprofit organization committed to improving public understanding of, and appreciation for, science. Visit the Science for the Public website for science info and for videos of other programs featuring outstanding scientists.

There is broad agreement amongst scientists that human-driven global climate change is real, and that impacts are increasingly serious. Yet despite this certainty among experts many Americans question whether climate change is even occurring. In order to understand how people learn about complex issues like climate change, it is essential to take into account factors such as personal experience, cognitive biases, and perceptions of one’s environment. In this talk, Coley, a cognitive psychologist, and Helmuth, a coastal marine biologist, will explore how understanding these factors can facilitate better methods for educating the public about climate change, and for communicating and enacting climate adaptation strategies.

Speakers:

Brian Helmuth | Professor of Marine & Environmental Sciences, Marine Science Center; and College of Social Sci. + Humanities – School for Public Policy/Urban Affairs | Northeastern University

Prof. Helmuth’s research and teaching focus on predicting the likely ecological impacts of climate change on coastal ecosystems, and on the development of products that are scientifically accurate, understandable, and useful by a diverse array of stakeholders. A major goal of this approach is to inform decision makers with scientifically accurate and useful forecasts.  While much of his work has focused on North American rocky intertidal ecosystems, he also collaborates with colleagues around the world, including Australia,BruneiCanadaChinaHong KongIraqItalySouth Africa; and the U.K.

John Coley | Associate Professor, Psychology | Northeastern University

Prof. Coley’s lab studies a host of interrelated questions about the structure of knowledge, reasoning, and conceptual development. How do we organize what we know? How do we use what we know to make guesses about what we don’t know? How do people decide what kind of knowledge is relevant in a particular situation? How does the acquisition of expertise influence how people organize and use knowledge? How do knowledge and reasoning change as children develop? How does growing up in different environments lead to different ways of thinking and reasoning about the world? Prof. Coley takes an experimental approach to answering these questions by systematically examining overt reasoning behavior in children and adults, as well as the processing that underlies such reasoning.

For scientists interested in sharing their work, please contact Yvonne Stapp (yvonne@scienceforthepublic.org).

Mar
8
Thu

Speaker: Kirk Johnson, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

More lecture and RSVP info coming soon… EVENT WEBSITE

About the Speaker
Dr. Kirk Johnson is the Sant Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. He oversees more than 460 employees and a collection of more than 145 million objects—the largest natural history collection in the world. The Museum hosts more than 7 million visitors annually and, last year, its scientists published over 730 scientific research papers and described 517 new species.

Johnson is a paleontologist who has led expeditions in 11 countries and 19 states that resulted in the discovery of more than 1,400 fossil sites. His research focuses on fossil plants and the extinction of the dinosaurs. He is known for his scientific books and articles, popular books, museum exhibits, presentations, and collaborations with artists. In 2010-11, he led the Snowmastodon Project, the excavation of an amazing ice age site near Snowmass Village, Colorado. This dig recovered more than 5,400 bones of mammoths, mastodons and other ice age animals and was featured in the NOVA documentary, Ice Age Death Trap, and in Johnson’s book, Digging Snowmastodon, Discovering an Ice Age World in the Colorado Rockies. Johnson received a 2016 Kavli Science Journalism Award for his role as host of the three-part NOVA series Making North America, which aired on PBS networks in November 2015. His newest book, Ancient Wyoming, explores the prehistory and geology of the Bighorn Basin.

Before coming to the Smithsonian, Johnson was vice president and chief curator at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, where he established the museum’s first comprehensive, long-term research and collections plan. Johnson holds numerous professional memberships, and in November, 2013, was appointed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee. He is a member of National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration and an elected Fellow of the Paleontological Society.

Johnson is originally from Bellevue, Washington, and has a bachelor’s degree in geology and fine art from Amherst College, a master’s degree in geology and paleobotany from the University of Pennsylvania and a doctorate in geology and paleobotany from Yale University. He completed postdoctoral research at the University of South Australia and served as a Crosby lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

About the Series
The “William F. Brace Lecture Series” honors the legacy of “legend in rock physics” and former EAPS Department Head Bill Brace, who passed away in 2012. The William F Brace Lecture is an annual all-department event at which a distinguished visitor from outside MIT is invited to speak on a subject of contemporary interest in earth, atmospheric or planetary science.

For more information please contact: Brandon Milardo, bmilardo@mit.edu.